Category Archives: Pronouncements

Garden Gnome Submissions Process

From time to time, the garden gnomes like to shake things up a bit as we are wont to do. We have noticed lately that there seems to be a bit of confusion about our submissions process and we were hoping to clarify things a bit. We’d like your help.

Will you take some time to give us some feedback on our submissions process? Feel free to check as many boxes as apply.

And we thank you for your assistance with this grave matter.

What's Wrong With the Garden Gnome Submissions Process?

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Re-Poll: Mythmaking Made Difficult

We ran this poll for a little while but came up with no definitive and overwhelming leader. You can check the results of the first run here.

As you can see, “Mythicals” is the winner with an impressive 4 votes. But “None of the Above – Keep Trying!” has a very close 3 votes. That doesn’t give me much of a comfort level. So the garden gnomes are demanding a re-vote. Unless our previous polls, this one has a deadline. Voting ends at midnight on March 31, 2014.

To keep the process streamlined, we’re keeping the two front runners of the previous election and adding two more candidates. As you can see, I’m a bit of a Lord Dunsany fan. So your other two options are “Lord Dunsany’s Castle” and “Gods of Pegāna.”

Just in case you’re wondering, here’s a little explanation of these two references:

Lord Dunsany is a bit of a forerunner of the modern fantasy genre. Since he was a bit of a nobleman in Ireland during his lifetime, he lived in a castle. But not just any castle. The castle itself has a reputation that is as historic and noteworthy as the family who resided in it. Which makes it a fitting title for an imprint focused on mythmaking, I think.

Going deeper into the Dunsanian canon, “Gods of Pegāna” is the first book published by the great Edward Plunkett, which was a great influence upon the likes of J.R.R. Tolkien, H.P. Lovecraft, and others.

Now that you have a little backstory, which do you think would make a better title for an imprint that explores mythmaking in an all new light?

For Retelling Old Myths and Creating New Ones, GGP Should Name Its New Imprint

  • Mythicals (67%, 2 Votes)
  • Gods of Pegāna (33%, 1 Votes)
  • Lord Dunsany's Castle (0%, 0 Votes)
  • None of the Above (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 3

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What Is A Narrative Poem?

By Allen Taylor

Chief Garden Gnome

Narrative poetry has fallen out of fashion. At one time, narrative poems were quite common. In fact, throughout much of history, poetry was used to tell a story much in the same way that fiction does today. Early literature was primarily written in verse or poetic form while still maintaining the elements of narrative.

So what constitutes a narrative poem as opposed to lyrical?

With lyrical poetry, the essence is wrapped up in the way the words fall together. The mode of expression is more important than the depiction of story. In fact, lyrical poetry may or may not tell a story at all. If it does, the mode of expression is at least equal in importance to the narrative if not more so.

By contrast, narrative poetry first and foremost tells a compelling story. Like good fiction – be it flash fiction, a short story, novelette or novella, or a full-fledged novel – it has to have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Central to its form is conflict, or tension.

That’s not to say that narrative poetry can’t contain lyrical elements. It most certainly can. A narrative poem can include any mode of expression common to any type of poetry. It can include elements of the avant-garde, surrealism, concrete poetry, rhyme and meter, typographical elements, various forms of alliteration, metaphor, irony, or any one of the other thousands of poetic elements in the poet’s bag of tricks. However, all of those elements must bow in service to the narrative itself and propel the action forward from rising action to the climax, the denouement, and the final line.

Narrative poems can be long or short as long as they tell a story. Very long narratives may rise to the status of epic as in the case of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, or they may simply be long narrative poems. On the other extreme, the could be as short as a Twitter poem.

They may or may not include characters, a plot, description and setting, or other elements of fiction. Or they may simply be constructed as dramatic monologues.

Narrative poetry is a flexible form. It has every bit of the same versatility as lyrical poetry with one primary ingredient that can’t and won’t be found in the latter – the story that begins, holds the reader’s attention through a narrative arc, and has a definite end that gives the reader a sense of satisfaction for having spent her time with the author. With all this going for it one must ask, why don’t poets write narrative poems any more?

The garden gnomes would like to invite you to submit a narrative poem to our next anthology, “Sulfurings.” Get more specific guidelines on all our Biblical Legends needs.

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What Should We Call Our ‘Mythmaking’ Imprint?

According to three different polls, including this one, fans of Garden Gnome Publications want to see an imprint that publishes novella-length re-tellings of old myths and creations of new ones. I’m really glad that’s the most popular idea we have for publishing novellas because I really like myths – especially the really weird ones.

The garden gnomes are using the term myth not in the popular sense of “this isn’t true” but in the sense of “this is a genre of storytelling that conveys a powerful message through the use of archetypes and easily identifiable icons.”

In other words, we just think myths are cool stories, man. We hope you agree.

If so, we’d be honored if you’d help us name this imprint. While we’re working out the details on the submission process, will you take the time to give us your feedback on what we should call this imprint? We’d greatly appreciate it. All you have to do is choose your favorite imprint title or tell us to blow smoke through our pie holes. Can you do that without being rude?

What Should Be The Name Of Our Imprint Exploring The Retelling Of Old Myths And The Creation Of New Ones?

  • Mythicals (40%, 4 Votes)
  • None of the Above - Keep Trying! (30%, 3 Votes)
  • Myths & Legends (20%, 2 Votes)
  • Mythocracy (10%, 1 Votes)
  • Myth Lab (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Mt. St. Olympus (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gods & Myths (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Mythellaneous (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dismythed (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 10

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Imprints: Take Our Poll

As Garden Gnome Publications prepares to unleash its inaugural anthology in the Biblical Legends Anthology Series, aptly titled Garden of Eden, we invite you to take the following poll and let us know which of these imprint ideas you think has the greatest potential. Which ones do you think would offer the most entertainment and/or educational value?

Which imprints would you like to see published by Garden Gnome Publications?

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‘Happy New Year’, The Garden Gnomes Say

Happy New Year, garden friends. We’ve been at your service for four months now and have managed to publish some great flash fiction. The Flim-Flim Games continue to be popular. December’s winner is “Fear” by Tim Wilkinson. Congratulations Tim!

We’re going to make a change for the Flim-Flam Games going forward. Instead of just counting Likes, we’re going to count all social media shares between Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and LinkedIn. For a fuller explanation of how this works, see our Flim-Flam Games page.

Our upcoming themes for the Flim-Flam Games are:

  • January: Legendary, mythological, or non-human creatures
  • February: Flaming arrows
  • March: Dragons, clovers, and/or ashes

Our target date for the Garden of Eden anthology is January 23rd. We’re hard at work to meet this date. Meanwhile, we’ve started planning for the next anthology, so start getting your submissions in!

Look for other announcements coming soon. We’ve got new products in the works, including more calls for submissions and possibly more games. We’ll also put out a call for an editor to join our team. Look for it by the end of the month.

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