Tag Archives: anthology series

Deluge, The Print Edition, Has Been Released

BLAS deluge e-bookA few days ago, the garden gnomes announced the publication of our third e-book in the Biblical Legends Anthology Series (BLAS). Finally, we’re proud to announce that Deluge: Stories of Survival & Tragedy in the Great Flood is available in print.

This is a significant development. It means that we can no longer call ourselves a “digital publishing company.” We have crossed a line.

Originally, we thought we’d capitalize on the growing electronic book craze. When we started Garden Gnome Publications, new readers were adopting e-books every day. It looked as if the growth of the market would last, but growth tapered off last year and it appears that the number of people who are adopting e-book-only reading patterns is decreasing. Therefore, we thought we’d be of better service to the speculative fiction reading community if we offered our products in print as well.

While Deluge: Stories of Survival & Tragedy in the Great Flood is currently the only BLAS title in print, it’s not the only titles that will be in print. Soon, we will convert Garden of Eden and Sulfurings: Tales from Sodom & Gomorrah into print.

At any rate, we won’t dilly-dally. We’re sure you’re anxious to hear where you can pick up the print edition of Deluge: Stories of Survival & Tragedy in the Great Flood. We currently offer it at an introductory price that will be good through Christmas Day. For a limited time only, you can get our best BLAS anthology to date for only $10.99 at CreateSpace and Amazon. We hope you’ll enjoy the read.

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The Genesis of the Incorporeum

“Did you have that dream again?”

It took Briallen a minute to figure out which crewmate was asking the question. She was still lost in her painting, being extra careful not to let a single drop of pigment escape in the null gravity.

Briallen placed her brush in the hollow palette where the tiny machinery would extract the paints and leave the bristles clean and ready for the next color. She looked up and saw a man of average height with hair buzzed close to his scalp. That described about half the men on the station.

“I was trying to be a tree, but the tree didn’t fit,” she explained. Briallen went through her mental records, trying to remember what the man’s name was. There were two engineers whose names sounded alike, and she was pretty sure he was one of them. Alec? Eric? It was something like that. “Or not exactly trying to be a tree, per se, but …” she paused, sighing, knowing that a moment ago, lost in her painting, she had the word and the concept on the tip of her tongue, but now it was lost. “I was trying to mind-meld with it or something.”

The man who might be Alec or Eric laughed. He was nice; she wished she could remember names better.

“This one’s different,” he said, maneuvering into her art space and examining her painting. “Less tree-like than the others.”

Briallen turned to look at the previous paintings she’d done, all arranged poetically on one wall. In some, the tree was large and symbolic, with roots that mirrored the spread of the branches. In others, the tree went through the seasons, enduring the winter and celebrating spring.

Her latest work was more impressionistic. She could still tell it was a tree, although the shape was not immediately obvious. “What bothers me most is the knowledge that it isn’t really a tree … it’s analogous to something we can’t yet comprehend …” She put the last of her painting supplies neatly away. “And I have no idea how I know that. I just do.”

The co-worker whose name began with a vowel regarded her with curiosity. Or maybe he thought she was nuts … Suddenly, Briallen felt uncomfortable. It felt too intimate, talking about her paintings and her dreams. She changed the subject.

“What’s Eve doing?” she asked.

“The same thing she’s been doing. Gathering energy, getting ready to unload her pent-up misery on anything that gets in her way.”

“Briallen, Archie …” a blonde head peeked in the door, curls forming a halo around her face. “The Commander wants everybody up top in fifteen minutes,” she said before vaulting right past. “I hear there’s going to be cake!”

Finish reading this story by AmyBeth Inverness in the Garden of Eden anthology. Get it FREE!

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Gossip in the Garden

It’s not every day you see a serpent upset a marriage, much less unbalance a whole universe and cast a world into the depths of evil, but that’s what happened last Tuesday. There I was, picking some fruit from the approved trees, when I noticed this naked girl walking up to the one tree we are not supposed to touch.

Now, Matilda, I said to myself, it’s none of your business, but there she goes up to the tree. La-di-da, like it was a school field trip. I saw some fruit I really wanted that just happened to be nearby, so I stepped closer and could not help but overhear the conversation that was going on.

“Surely you will not die,” the serpent was hissing, which I thought odd. First, it was a serpent talking, and second, it was a bold-faced lie. The Almighty had specifically said, “Eat of this tree and you shall die.” Sounded pretty clear to me. I even wrote it down.

Finish reading this story by JD DeHart in the Garden of Eden anthology. Get it FREE!

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Come, Partake In Our Sulfurings

sulfur rainAs we await the return of our last couple of contracts from writers for the stories going into the Garden of Eden anthology, we are now beginning to take submissions for the next one. The theme for the second Biblical Legends Speculative Fiction digital anthology is Sulfurings.

It’s pretty simple what we’re asking writers to do. Give us a short story, poem, flash fiction story, or essay (loosely) concerning the inhabitants of the ancient cities of Sodom and Gomorrah as they struggle to survive amid the sulfur raining down upon them from above.

Our only stipulation is that none of the characters can be Lot or his family. Tell us who the characters are and how they survive.

Stories can be apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic – during the sulfuric rain or in the aftermath. We just want them to be good.

On poetry, we’re looking for narrative poems of 50-500 lines. Find out more about our BLAS submissions guidelines and our general submission guidelines. Just don’t make us suffer.

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Deadline Extension For The Garden Of Eden Anthology

Deadlines are necessary evils. On the one hand, they serve as closure for a project that, without a definite end in sight, could go on forever. On the other hand, they provide writers with the necessary motivation to get writing and to complete that project they’ve put on the back burner.

Recent events have encouraged me to re-consider the established deadline for the Garden of Eden anthology. That deadline was going to be tonight at midnight EST.

I put a lot of thought into that deadline. I gave writers four months to prepare for it, but because Garden Gnome Publications is still in its infancy, it’s unreasonable to expect that word has spread to all corners of the globe. The gnomes are humble enough to know that we haven’t even penetrated the first corner yet. But we’re hopeful.

Nevertheless, one writer pointed out that today’s deadline is right at the end of NaNoWriMo, so many writers are focused on kicking out their 50,000 word tomes. Believe me, we understand.

On another note, the gnomes have received some great entries, however, we feel like we could use a few more. Therefore, we’re extending the deadline to midnight EST on Tuesday, December 3, 2013. We hope this will give writers a chance to complete their NaNoWriMo novels and get us a few more submissions to offer readers of the first anthology.

What Kind Of Submissions We’re Looking For

I thought it might be beneficial to discuss what we’re actually hoping to achieve with this anthology. While we’ve received some excellent submissions so far, we have noticed that there is a bit of a disconnect between our hopes and some of the submissions we have received. Therefore, an elaboration is offered to help clear this misunderstanding up.

First, there is a reason we’ve dubbed our anthology series Biblical Legends Speculative Fiction Anthology Series. The idea is to use the Bible as a starting point for the imagination.

We are not necessarily interested in stories that lift up the Bible as the true Word of God, a necessary and inspired holy book, or the Truth. That said, we have no interest in dismissing stories that do so if those stories are good.

The “Biblical” in the name of the anthology series is simply a reference to a body of literature contained within the Bible. Our intent is to focus on stories and legends within the Bible that have an element of absurdity to them when viewed from an early 21st century perspective. Their truth or falsity is not our concern. What we want are stories that use the legendary tales themselves as a jumping off point.

We thought the Garden of Eden would be the perfect starting point – for a number of reasons.

  1. It is the first story, or legend, in the Bible where humans are the focal point.
  2. As legend, it is the genesis of the Bible’s overall story arc – at least where humanity is concerned.
  3. Thirdly, we just thought it would be fun.

The reason we’re calling the story anthologies “speculative fiction” is not as obvious as we initially thought. Speculative fiction is not an easy-to-define genre. It can include any number of fantastical elements that might include:

  • Science fiction
  • Fantasy
  • Horror
  • Weird elements
  • Supernatural elements
  • Utopian or dystopian story lines
  • Apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic tales
  • Superhero or superhuman characters
  • Alternate histories
  • And other miscellaneous oddities

Trust me, we’re interested in all of the above. Your only limitation as a writer is your imagination. We encourage you to go hog wild. We have imposed only one limitation – please, no Biblical characters.

Why No Biblical Characters?

Look at any submission guidelines and you’ll discover that there is always a reason behind them. Writers do not have to agree with those reasons. But if you want to get published, then it’s in your best interests to take note of those guidelines and follow them.

The garden gnomes decided to stipulate one restriction – no Biblical characters – for one simple reason: We want to encourage the speculative aspect of “speculative fiction.” It’s too easy to fall back on those old paradigms that have captured the human imagination for millennia.

There have been countless variants of the Adam and Eve story. While many of those are speculative, we believe they are overdone. It’s time for something new. We’re not interested in new takes on old paradigms. We want new paradigms. We want to take the stories that people are familiar with in new directions – myth and reality be damned. That is the essence of speculative fiction, in our view. “Make it new” is not just for poets and disciples of Ezra Pound.

From time to time, we may allow the inclusion of Biblical characters into a particular anthology. When so, it will be noted. Otherwise, we ask that writers do their best to honor this restriction.

The Garden of Eden’s Greatest Needs

We’d love to get more flash fiction and short stories. You can never have too many submissions to choose from. At least, we’re not so overwhelmed – yet – that we would change our minds on that point. But those are not our greatest needs.

In order for our vision to be most perfectly fulfilled, we’d like to see more narrative poems and essays submitted.

Narrative Poems

Narrative poems are hard to write. Believe me, we know this. But we want narrative poems, as opposed to lyrical poems, for one simple reason. They render more easily to the digital format.

Another reason we insist on narrative poems is because the anthologies are intended to be stories. Stories by definition are narratives. And we want longer narratives because our intent is to publish only one poem per anthology. We want it to be a good one.

In this day, there are few poets writing narrative poems. Most poetry is “free verse,” which is really prose with line breaks. So why not write prose?

While prose does not necessarily lend itself to narrative form, per se, we believe the two go hand in hand quite nicely. Therefore, we’re looking for long narrative poems in the range of 50 to 500 lines. But understand a few things about narrative poetry, specifically what it is and what it isn’t.

  • Narrative poetry does not necessarily exclude lyrical qualities. As an example, I’d like to point your attention to a narrative poem titled “On The Road Home” by yours truly. It was published in the November 2012 issue of Ygdrasil as the Post Scriptum. We encourage you to read this poem and take note of its many lyrical qualities, including many formal poetic elements, while remaining true to the narrative form.
  • Secondly, narrative poetry can be surreal or avant-garde. Here’s another narrative poem that includes many formal and free verse elements with some concrete poetry and avant-garde qualities, as well. Warning: It’s a long one. But notice how the poem moves through it’s narrative using visual elements, backward lines, indents, and odd elements that take the reader by surprise. I hesitate to use this as an example because many of the visual elements found on the web page could not be accomplished in an e-book, so this is not really what we’re looking for. It is an example, however, of how creative you can get with narrative poetry. For that, I’d say it’s well worth a read.
  • First and foremost, narrative poetry tells a story. That’s what we want: A story told through poetic elements on the digital page. Get creative, but please stay within our guidelines. No Biblical characters and no lyrical verses.

The two biggest mistakes we’ve seen so far with poems submitted for The Garden of Eden anthology are 1) the use of Adam, Eve, and the serpent and 2) poems being too short and lyrical in nature. These poems are automatically discarded and not considered. We really want your speculative narratives.

Essays

Essays pose a different challenge. We’ve had a couple of submissions for essays but nothing that has me excited – yet. I’m still looking for that one perfect essay.

We’re not necessarily looking for expository or academic writing. We use the term “essay” loosely. What we really want is creative nonfiction that says something interesting about the theme. Hear how Lee Gutkind defines the genre of creative nonfiction:

In some ways, creative nonfiction is like jazz—it’s a rich mix of flavors, ideas, and techniques, some of which are newly invented and others as old as writing itself. Creative nonfiction can be an essay, a journal article, a research paper, a memoir, or a poem; it can be personal or not, or it can be all of these.

What we’re looking for are thoughts, expressions, and personal writings that explore the theme in new ways or that give us a new take on the theme. If we received an “essay” about the Garden of Eden for our anthology which we believed was worthy of publishing, our hope would be that it would give us something to mull over and cause us to think differently about our lives. We don’t know what that means precisely, but we know what it doesn’t mean.

We want something creative, something imaginative, something outside the bounds of tradition. We want it well-written and thought-provoking. We want it to incorporate all elements of genre writing without falling neatly into any genre. If that makes any sense.

Can we tell you what we want? No. But we’ll know it when we see it. It’s up to you to help us realize it when it presents itself.

Our Final Invitation

Having said all of that (we apologize for the length), we’d like to send out one final invite to writers, poets, and creative essayists to send us your best work. Give us your take on the Garden of Eden theme, and please follow our general submission guidelines. We’re looking forward to seeing what forbidden fruit you have to offer.

As always, feel free to ask your questions in the comments.

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